Tag Archives: Navy Yard Shooting

Sarah Palin: As Freedom Destroys Itself, Laws Can’t Protect a Society That Has Lost Its Way

Sarah Palin Grizzly Bear Training Camp

Governor Sarah Palin has written a powerful op-ed talking about America’s greatness, and the perils we face today. She reminds America that we have lost our way.

As Governor Palin points out, our Constitution was written for a moral society. Our Founders instinctively understood our Constitution would NOT work in a corrupt, amoral society.

~ Gary

By Sarah Palin

All of us were horrified by the murders at the Washington Navy Yard this week. Once again, in the aftermath of a shooting, a new installment of the debate about gun laws has broken out. But what we really need is a new discussion about what kind of people we are and what kind of country we want to be.

It’s no secret which side I’m on in any debate involving the Second Amendment (or the whole Constitution, for that matter). We call Alaska America’s Last Frontier, and firearms are a big part of our lifestyle here because they are part of our frontier tradition. And, as I tell my daughters, the ability to use a firearm responsibly and to defend yourself is also part of our heritage as American women.

The iconic musket over the fireplace wasn’t just for the menfolk on the frontier. Those stalwart women who crossed oceans and wilderness to settle our country knew how to protect themselves and their families. (One of my favorite scenes in the miniseries John Adams is when Abigail Adams, alone with her children in besieged Massachusetts while her husband is away at the Continental Congress, shoulders the family musket to protect her little ones when she hears the distant sounds of battle. That’s our heritage, ladies.)

Hunting is an integral part of our lifestyle in the 49th state. Using guns isn’t just recreation for us; it’s how many of us get our dinner. Granted, today, with a grocery store on virtually every corner, there isn’t the actual necessity to live a “subsistence lifestyle” that there was a generation ago in Alaska when I was growing up, but my family still lives by the motto “We eat; therefore, we hunt.” We live off the healthy organic protein provided by Alaska’s wild fish and game.

Todd and I have taught our kids how to handle firearms responsibly, just as my dad taught me. In fact, we took our girls for a special hunt on Mother’s Day this year at our cabin looking out at the distant majestic peak of Mt. McKinley, and we had a blast teaching twelve-year-old Piper mounted shooting in warm Montana this summer.

I’m proud of my frontier heritage, and I’ll fight vehemently against anything that would limit the constitutional rights of Americans. But I can certainly sympathize with the many well-meaning Americans who desperately feel the need to find a way to prevent these senseless killings. Who among us doesn’t feel sadness, anger, and even despair after these tragedies?

But we must remember that emotion won’t make anybody safer or protect our rights. Beware of politicians who exploit our emotions in an attempt to pass laws that even they admit wouldn’t have prevented the violence.

CNN’s Don Lemon recently saw the light on this issue and highlighted the Centers for Disease Control study showing that so-called military assault rifles account for a small fraction of gun violence. The overwhelming majority of gun-related deaths are inflicted with handguns, but a ban on handguns is not only politically untenable; it would also hinder the ability of law-abiding citizens to defend themselves (especially Americans who live in troubled urban areas where the police are slow to respond to emergency calls).

Instead of offering real solutions based on facts, reactionary politicians offer us the politics of emotion, which is the opposite of leadership. It is the manipulation of the people by the political class for their own political ends. It is so very self-serving, but, worse, it is destructive.

The first thing politicians ask after these tragedies is essentially: “What can we do to limit the freedom of the people?

And that is the wrong question. The question we should be asking is: “What can we do to nurture and support a people capable of living in freedom?

Earlier this year I spoke at the NRA convention and reminded a conscientious, patriotic audience that our country’s Founders asked themselves that question and knew the answer. They understood that a free people must either nurture morality or lose their freedom. John Adams wrote, “Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.” Not coincidentally, he wrote that to the officers of the Massachusetts militia when the young republic was on the verge of war with France. He reminded those officers who were charged with leading armed men that the freedoms secured by the Constitution take for granted a decent and civil society.

This isn’t just a question for American society. It’s a civilizational question for all humanity. Margaret Thatcher spoke eloquently of this co-dependence of freedom and morality. She said, “Freedom will destroy itself if it is not exercised within some sort of moral framework, some body of shared beliefs, some spiritual heritage transmitted through the Church, the family, and the school.”

I’m reminded of that quote every time I see politicians reach for the easy answers instead of asking the hard questions after tragedies like the one this week. When they seek to strip away our Second Amendment rights instead of suggesting that those who hide behind the First Amendment need to act more responsibly, they are helping freedom destroy itself.

When Hollywood glorifies violence with its movies and music, but then underwrites efforts to take away our rights, it is helping freedom destroy itself. When those incorporating virtue into their lives are criticized, mocked, and bullied while pop culture’s kingmakers elevate and celebrate a self-centered “I’ll do what I want and consequences be damned” mentality, those kingmakers and bullies are helping freedom destroy itself. And when We the People shrug our shoulders and duck our heads while society becomes more cynical and our sense of family and community atrophies, we’re all helping freedom destroy itself.

Americans have always had access to firearms. Guns certainly aren’t any more pervasive now than they were back when the Minutemen were stockpiling weapons at Lexington and Concord. But something definitely has changed since then. It’s not the weapons. It’s us.

Instead of rushing to find some magical legislative solution, we need to ask ourselves a few hard questions: Are we creating a culture that can live and thrive in freedom? Do we have bold leaders willing and able to nurture such a culture? Do we have artists whose works reflect and inspire such a culture? Consider the answers to these questions carefully, because, if the answers are no, then we are in much more trouble than any new law can fix.

A decent and moral society is guided by voluntary self-restraint. The less moral we are, the more legalistic we become. But more laws can’t protect a civilization that has lost its way. At most, they’re just tiny speed bumps for a runaway truck.

The solutions we seek won’t be found in the halls of Congress or state legislatures. Might I humbly suggest that we step back from the TV, take a breath, hug our kids, reach out to friends and neighbors, and say a prayer.

Governor Palin posted some photos on her Facebook page to go along with her article

This is the from the Mother’s Day hunt I mentioned in the NRO op-ed:

Sarah Palin Mothers Day Hunt

This is Piper mounted shooting in Montana:

Piper Palin Montana Mounted Shooting

And here I am doing my Annie Oakley thing:

Sarah Palin Annie Oakley

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Why Did Navy Yard Murderer Aaron Alexis Create A Webpage with Name “Mohammed Salem”

Aaron+Alexis+mug+better

By Gary P Jackson

After naming the wrong man and the shooter, and getting the weapons used completely wrong, here’s yet one more thing the corrupt media is not telling you:

From Pamela Geller [Atlas Shrugs]

Law enforcement officials told NBC News that Alexis created a webpage with the name “Mohammed Salem.” This is the first I am hearing of this, and have seen no media mention of it (although the fact that he had been a Buddhist has been headlined and recounted numerous times, despite the fact is that there is no compulsion to violence, oppression and ethnic cleansing in the teachings of Buddhism).

It is striking that he would create a page “Mohammed Salem.” Perhaps as he became more violent, he identified with the homicidal doctrine of jihad. I do not expect the jihad-aligned media to look into this aspect of the case.

Clearly, Muslim Brotherhood groups were concerned that it was jihad. Hamas-CAIR canceled a press conference on Tuesday that was going to expose the funding of the “islamophobia” industry. What funding? I mean, really. And devout Muslims cheered and suggested responsibility for the Navy Yard shooting that killed 13. And many jihadists “expressed their joy” that the Navy shooting was a response to Muslim leader Ayman al-Zawahiri ‘s strikes in America.

Navy Yard gunman’s mother says she is heartbroken and sorry for families,” by Kyle Eppler, Pete Williams and Erin McClam for NBC News, September 18 (thanks to Robert Spencer):

The mother of Aaron Alexis, the Washington Navy Yard shooter, said Wednesday that she was heartbroken and sorry for the families of the victims and that she was glad he is “in a place where he can no longer do harm to anyone.”

In a brief statement to a reporter in New York, the woman, Cathleen Alexis, said her son “has murdered 12 people and wounded several others.”…

Authorities say they are still looking for a motive. Since Alexis carried out the attack Monday at the headquarters of the Naval Sea Systems Command, signs have emerged of a troubled history.

• Alexis, who served as a naval reservist from 2007 to 2011 and worked more recently as a civilian contractor, had a military disciplinary record that included disorderly conduct, insubordination and unexcused absences.

Newport, R.I., police said he called them Aug. 7 to say he had changed hotels twice because he believed people were chasing him and sending vibrations through the walls to keep him from sleeping.

Police said they had forwarded their report to police at the naval station in Newport. Military officials told NBC News on Wednesday that they had found no evidence that naval police forwarded the information to any higher command outside the base.

• The Department of Veterans Affairs said Wednesday that it saw Alexis twice. He went to a VA emergency room in Providence, R.I., on Aug. 23 complaining of insomnia and was given sleep medicine and told to follow up with a doctor, the agency said. Five days later, Alexis showed up at a VA emergency room in Washington to get a refill and was again encouraged to see a doctor, the VA said.

The VA said Alexis denied struggling with anxiety or depression or having thoughts about hurting himself or others. It also said he enrolled in VA health care in February 2011 and never sought an appointment for mental health.

• Alexis also had run-ins with the law over gun violence. He was accused in 2004 of having shot out the tires of a car in Seattle and in 2010 of having fired a gun into an upstairs apartment in Fort Worth, Texas.

• Friends and relatives have also said he had a preoccupation with the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, felt slighted as a veteran, had money problems and was so unhappy with his life that he considered leaving the U.S.

Law enforcement officials told NBC News that Alexis created a webpage with the name “Mohammed Salem,” but they said he never did anything with it. They said they had found nothing else that might indicate any interest in violent jihad or even in Islam.

We may never know the truth about apron Alexis, and what his real motivation was. He was clearly disturbed, and had serious mental health issues. Reportedly he was hearing voices for days leading up to the murders, and we know that Navy and DoD bureaucrats dropped the ball all along the way, by ignoring, or failing to report clear signs of dangerous activities by Alexis.

It’s telling that Muslims were quick to celebrate the mass murder, and hoped to claim responsibility for it. That should tell you all you need to know about those animals.

The Navy Yard shooting was another in a long line of preventable shootings, that likely happened because of political correctness. In the Ft Hood massacre, Hassan had actually TOLD his superiors of his plans to slaughter “infidels” at his earliest convenience, and yet, since he was Muslim, his superiors were too timid to take action, fearing retribution from the left. I’m guessing this played some part in the Navy shooting as well. Here’s a black guy, clearing having difficulties, but hey, it would be racist to point all of that out.

At some point, we have to say to hell with political correctness, and call a spade a spade. I KNOW Hassan could have been stopped before the Ft Hood massacre, and while I hope he rots in hell, I can’t help but think Alexis could have been stopped long before he carried out his mass murder spree, and 12 innocent lives could have been spared.

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